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Opposites Working Together

June 02, 2011

My husband and I are truly polar opposites. I am sensitive; he has a hard outer shell. I love hugs; he would rather “high-five”.  I devote my time and thoughts to serious matters like education and bettering society. My husband is happy if we have enough money to afford fishing trips and the buy-in for the World Poker Tour. I want my kids to excel and change the world for the better. My husband is happy if they are not on drugs or pregnant by the time they are 18. I have no idea how and why we got together but here we are...together.

Who has the better perspective from which to raise our children?  I contend we both do…together.  You see by ourselves we are a bit extreme, but together we strike the perfect parenting balance.  (OK, maybe not perfect, but it works for us.)

I used to hate that my husband and I were polar opposites. Now I am coming to see how it benefits my kids and our family as a whole.  Since we disagree regularly, the compromise is usually the perfect thing for everyone.

Good parenting is the functional medley of collaborative efforts.  Parents spend the most time with their children and therefore we are the best evaluators of their needs. However, we cannot think of everything, so we need constructive feedback from others.  Being from a large and very close family, I have no problem getting feedback on anything I ask…and even things I don’t ask.  Below is a phrase that states the way I filter feedback without hurting feelings.  I have never spoken this out loud, but always use it as a way to manage advice:   

We appreciate the advice. We heard it. We evaluated it. We plan to use some of it but we are the best evaluators of how and when to implement your advice because we are the only ones who have all the facts about our life.  Thank You. I appreciate it and I will let you know if I need your help implementing it.

…and if that doesn’t work, I just stop answering my phone for a few days. 

My husband and I are truly polar opposites. Iam sensitive; he has a hard outer shell. I love hugs; he would rather “high-five”.  I devote my time and thoughts to serious matters like education and bettering society. My husband is happy if we have enough money to afford fishing trips and the buy-in for the World Poker Tour. I want my kids to excel and change the world for the better. My husband is happy if they are not on drugs or pregnant by the time they are 18. I have no idea how and why we got together but here we are...together.

Who has the better perspective from which to raise our children?  I contend we both do…together.  You see by ourselves we are a bit extreme, but together we strike the perfect parenting balance.  (OK, maybe not perfect, but it works for u

I used to hate that my husband and I were polar opposites. Now Iam coming to see how it benefits my kids and our family as a whole.  Since we disagree regularly, the compromise is usually the perfect thing for ever

Good parentingis the functional medley collaborative efforts.  Parents spend the most time with their children and therefore we are the best evaluators of their needs. However, we cannot think of everything, so we need constructive feedback from others.  Being from a large and very close family, I have no problem getting feedback on anything I ask…and even things I don’t ask.  Below is a phrase that states the way I filter feedback without hurting feelings.  I have never spoken this out loud, but always use it as a way to manage a

We appreciate the advice. We heard it. We evaluated it. We plan to usesome of it but we are the best evaluators of how and when to implement your advice because we are the only ones who have all the facts about our life.  Thank You. I appreciate it and I will let you know if I need your help implementing it.

…and if that doesn’t work, I just stop answering my phone for a few days. 

  

 

 

 

Comments: 3

Top Ten Back To School Things To Do

August 19, 2011

My children are starting school soon and I’m planning every detail of our morning, pick-up, after school, homework, evening ritual and bedtime. My thinking is to be proactive and plan before hand so the school year starts on a positive note.

Here are some things I put on my “to do” list

  1. Get school supplies. Most school websites have a list and some office supply stores carry lists for the neighborhood schools.
  2. Schedule the flu shot for yourself and the kids.
  3. Review bus, class, and bell schedules, as well as school policies. 
  4. Research and plan for extracurricular activities for children if it’s applicable.
  5. Plan an approach to getting children to sleep at the proper time. My girls have been staying up too late. I plan to  gradually set their bedtime earlier over a period of two weeks so they acclimate to their new schedule.
  6. Discuss the following issues: bullying, making friends, the value of education & learning, and finally the importance of good communication.  Let them know you are always ready to listen and be available to them. 
  7. If you children are new to the school, let them tour the school and meet their teacher. If your school has a social event, attend.
  8. Clothes shopping if necessary.
  9. Help children get and stay organized.  Provide a designated area of your house for homework and storing school materials.
  10. Prepare a list of healthy lunch choices in advance. This will make shopping and planning easier. 
Comments: 3

Back To School - Part II

August 23, 2011

These are my first five safety tips for Back To School.

  1. Children should have their home address and phone number memorized
  2. For extra assurance, keep a note in children’s bags containing their home address and phone number.
  3. Keep your children’s names off their backpacks, jewelry, and clothing. If a stranger sees their name, he could use the information to manipulate children into thinking they know the stranger.
  4. Children should memorize their bus number if they take the bus. For children who walk to school, remind them to avoid talking to strangers. For more safety tips on traveling to and from school, go to http://www.rd.com/family/back-to-school-safety-tips/
  5. Keep backpacks as light as possible so children don’t injure their backs from carrying heavy loads

Here are additional Back To School issues discussed in the following articles:

http://www.usa.gov/Topics/Back_to_School.shtml

http://safekids.org/safety-basics/safety-spotlight/back-to-school-safety/

http://www.nsc.org/safety_home/SafetyObservances/Pages/BackToSchoolSafety.aspx

This site has great tips on how to deal with bullies. Scroll down the page to find these tips at  http://www.aap.org/advocacy/releases/augschool.cfm

RESPECT

August 29, 2011

Here are my top ten habits to gain children’s respect.

  1. Let children know you care about them
  2. Have age-appropriate and realistic expectations of children.
  3. Show consideration and respect to children. They will return what is modeled.
  4. Do admit and apologize if you have done something wrong.
  5. Have fun every day.
  6. Avoid comparing children.
  7. Avoid discussing children’s misdeeds with other children.
  8. Discipline in a way that is consistent and fair.
  9. Make sure children really understand why they are being punished.  Give children a chance to explain their part if necessary.  
  10. Avoid threats and follow through on consequences.
Comments: 1

Nutrition

September 20, 2011

 Here is a simple guide to teaching your children about the benefits of different color veggies and fruits. 

 

Color Fruit or Veggies

What it helps

Natural Plant Pigment

Red

Heart

Lycopene

Orange & Yellow

Eyes

Carotenoids

White: garlic

Keeps you from getting sick

Anthoxanthins

Green

Bones & Teeth

Chlorophyll

Blue & Purple

Memory

Anthocyanins 

 

Read more at http://vickids.tamu.edu/nutrition/index.html

 

Tags: Parenting
Comments: 2

Lesson Plan

September 28, 2011

I recently moved out-of-state and started a new job.  It has been a busy transition and I'd like to apologize to any of my regular readers for my inconsistency in posting.  My plan is to start my regular postings on Mondays and Thursdays.

This is my first time teaching full time since my kids were born.  My worry is that my parenting will suffer now that I am working.   The other day my daughters didn't want to eat their broccoli.  I was so tired I almost just let it go.  Will one day without veggies hurt them?  Maybe not but it will throw off my consistency in making them eat a balanced meal.   Instead of forcing them to eat broccoli, I told them to imagine the broccoli as trees.  My sister chimed in that the kids could pretend they are giraffes eating leaves off a tree.  My children, niece and nephew all begged us to hold  the broccoli up in the air while they stretched their necks to reach the leaves.   I'm sure you can imagine the children wanted to continue eating broccoli and they each ate three full servings of broccoli.  Amazing that such a simple activity could motivate children to do what you want them to do.

Comments: 5
 
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